sng magazine


The Theme of Fear in Twilight


The twilight films and books, upon which the films are based, are interesting collection of works, remedial in their writing style and themes, one which influences the concept of fear in a healthy relationship.


In all of the twilight books and by extension the films, there is an underlying concept of fear. At all times the main character is living in fear. Upon meeting the man with him she ends up marrying, fear is ever present. She is fearful of the man initially. She is afraid that this man will be unable to control himself near her. The man is equally afraid that he will kill her. He is afraid of causing her physical pain, something he does more than once throughout the series. She is then a frayed knot of the physical pain that she acknowledges he has caused and will continue to cause, but instead of not being with him. In spite of the initial fear of hurt and physical pain, there is a deeply unsettling fear of loss that keeps them bound together. The interdependency between the main characters causes them to fear ever being apart from one another, certain that they would not survive. In fact, as the series progresses the main male character admits that if he were to lose his female companion is only option would be suicide. The fear of losing her is enough to drive him to take his own life.


As the film progresses there are other forms of fear. Fear develops as the risk of death and violence presents itself. The risk of being discovered by other vampires and destroyed by them causes great fear and the main character and all of her supporting characters. The main male character and his family are fearful for her life. And rather than rectify the situation by converting her into a vampire, the main male character is fearful that he will be unable to stop himself from consuming all of her blood, even though he knows it will kill her, and being without her would in turn kill him. The fear of being unable to control him from causing her severe harm and eventual death is an ever present theme. Once this task has been completed, continual fear exists.


There is fear that her family by extension will be in danger. There is fear that upon breaking up, she will be unable to continue. And she is at risk and scared, full of fear, the main male character returns to her in some fashion or another, something which prompts her to continue down her dangerous path. As the books and films progress, additional forms of this feeling arise. Following a marriage there is fear that copulation will cause her severe physical pain due to the damage and the uncontrollable nature of the male character. Upon discovering pregnancy there is additional fear that the child will kill the mother as it grows inside of her and that both will not be able to survive. Overall these poorly written books are a cheap thrill, one which encourages children to develop a fearful relationship with those that they love, one fraught with insecurity, suicidal thoughts, and violence.